• Gunpoint

    It’s no longer enough that a suspect has a gun before a cop can use lethal force. Now, apparently, armed criminals pose no lethal threat to cops until they actually point their guns at police officers.

    In fact, Charlotte-Mecklenburg NAACP President Minister Corine Mack said, “In my mind, and in most of the community’s mind, it really doesn’t matter if he had a gun.” Really, reverend? What chance do police officers stand in this surreal environment of yours?  

    Okay, now that my head has stopped spinning from the gross negligence of such thinking, let me put on my teacher’s cap. I’m always railing about how the cop leaders are guilty of their own gross negligence in their failure to educate the public about what cops do. So, here goes…

    When cops are dealing with a suspect and an officer sees that a suspect has access to a gun, no matter where the gun is, you’ll hear the officer shout, “GUN!” at the top of his or her lungs. No, the cop won’t wait until the suspect pulls the gun out and points it at one of them before yelling to warn other officers of the imminent—yes, imminent—danger.

    Try this experiment: Tuck an object into your pocket or waistband as if it were a gun. Have another person hold an object in his hand—maybe a book—as if it were a gun.

    Okay, you are the “police officer.” Your “gun” is in its “holster.” The other person is the “suspect.” He or she is holding a “gun” but is not pointing it at you at the moment.

    Now, stand about ten feet apart, facing each other. Okay, here’s how it works: The officer, you, may not draw your gun until the suspect points his or her gun at you.

    How long did it take the suspect to point the gun at you? One second? Less? Did you even touch your gun before he pointed his at you? Bang! You’re dead.

    Even if you already had your gun out of your holster, how quickly could the suspect turn his gun on you? Would you get your shot off before the suspect could shoot you? Maybe? Is maybe good enough for your spouse and kids?

    If the standard for using deadly force changes so cops have to wait until suspects point their guns at officers before officers can shoot, we’re gonna have a bunch of dead cops.

    Oh, wait. That’s the point for some people, right? What was that Black Lives Matter chant during a march in New York City last year?

    “What do we want?”

    “Dead cops.”

    “When do we want them?”

    “Now!”

  • Seattle’s Homeless Camp Removal Protocol: If They Refuse to Obey, Let ‘em Stay

    How’s this for a government vagrant removal “protocol?” As I understand it, as explained on a morning radio talk show, the city of Seattle has set into place a system to remove “homeless” encampments from city streets. One of the city’s many homeless hovels is currently blighting 2nd Avenue, Downtown.

    Seattle’s protocol for sidewalk encampment removal requires all agencies involved in the cleanup, police, DSHS, solid waste, etc., be present at the location to complete a removal. All of them for the entire time.

    Since the police had to leave—you know—to do real police work, and some of the lovely “beneficiaries of liberal largess” refused mother city’s request to stop defiling Downtown sidewalks, the “eviction” ended.

    This protocol is insane and is designed to appear as if liberal city leaders are doing something about the vagrancy problem when they are doing the opposite: making it worse.  

     

    Liberal government has been the rule in Seattle forever

    Except for a few respites with a conservative city attorney, liberal government presided over Seattle during my police career. Over more than two decades, the city hasn’t solved the “homeless” problem; they’ve made it worse—much worse.

    This is not a new problem. Several years ago, shortly before I retired, I remember walking on the sidewalk northbound on Broadway between Madison and Union Streets. I was in uniform, on duty. Someone had set up a tent on the sidewalk next to a city telephone pole.

    Even many Seattleites driving by looked at me incredulously, as I did nothing. What could I do? My city had de-policed me. If I had rousted the occupant, the city might accuse me of a civil rights violation. Why would any cop risk that?

    Ironically, it’s illegal to camp in a city park. At least, it used to be.    

    The above lunacy recently led to the death of a 19-year-old street-camper run over by a car at an I-5 off-ramp in the U. District.

     

    Liberal policies have never been and never will be successful—by design

    The liberal’s attempts to solve Seattle’s vagrancy problem has been a disaster and will continue to be. The people living in tents along freeways and on city sidewalks are not the homeless families and mentally ill folks Seattle’s bleating hearts would like you to believe. Not most of them, anyway. Most I’ve dealt with were chronically inebriated criminals who eschewed civil society and reveled in their make-believe, makeshift communities. 

     

    Seattle: no respect for “homeless” as people responsible for their lives

    The situation will not be resolved until Seattle’s liberal, political power seekers begin to respect these people as human beings, not children, by holding them responsible for the state of their lives and for their actions.

    There is nothing wrong with also offering these folks any services available. However, if they are not held accountable for the condition of their lives or their irresponsible actions, why not choose the handouts and false sympathy that keep these folks perpetually contemptuous of civil society and dependent on liberal government?

    It’s an insult to those who have courageously dragged themselves out of the mire of drug and alcohol addiction, crime, and the resulting poverty, to give the sidewalk campers a pass.

  • Myth Affects Cops

    I went to a retirement party the other night for one of the best cops I’ve ever known. The term legendary came up many times during the evening. Most of the stories we told about him were great fun to tell, but it was something he said during his speech that struck me.

    After acknowledging “going out while still vertical,” he said, “I make no apologies for being a cop. I am not ashamed of being a police officer. I am proud of my career.”

    What a sorry state for American law enforcement that a cop like him felt it necessary to say this. The room was full of cops, friends, and family. Yet, the mood of the nation (as expressed by anti-police factions) descended on the celebration.

    As an officer and a sergeant, this man served his community for over three decades. Nearly all of it was in patrol where most police work is done. Sadly, there are people who couldn’t care less about this man’s service and dedication.

    Those people work hard to perpetuate the myth that the cops are “broken,” so they can destroy what cops work hard to build–safe communities.

    The cop haters should be the ones making apologies and feeling ashamed, not the cops.