• Child Suspended for “Liking” Image of Toy Gun on Instagram.

    The First and Second Amendments are under heavy attack by the radical left. We see this leftist nonsense to squelch free speech and abridge gun rights every day. The following story combines constitutional attacks on the First, Second, Fourth—and probably Fifth Amendments Against a public middle school student.

    Now, I will concede that public school officials can argue that they have no idea what to do anymore—mostly, because of other public school officials who adopt stupid policies. We critics often say, “Just use common sense.” Well, much of the problem these days is that commonsensical school officials are not allowed to apply their common sense. In fact, school districts often mandate ludicrous policies that force officials to act in direct contravention to common sense or risk losing their jobs or worse. Remember the second-grader who got “dispended” because he threw an invisible grenade to rescue the world? Still, that does not mean we should stop fighting to make sure common sense prevails.

    So, in this story on the NRA-ILA website, according to WBRC Fox 19 News in Trenton, Ohio, middle school student Zachary Bowlin got himself suspended for violating the school board’s “zero tolerance” policy. The policy prohibits, “violent, disruptive, harassing, intimidating, bullying, or any other inappropriate behavior by its students.” What heinous act did Zach commit to elicit such wrath from school superintendent Russ Fussnecker? After school one evening, at home, while perusing the Instagram social media website, Zach had the unmitigated audacity to “Like” a picture of an Airsoft gun—a toy. No, really!  

    For those unfamiliar with Airsoft guns, the name implies its function. It uses air to propel a soft projectile (the size of a pea). The guns are plastic and the projectiles (bullets) are designed not to injure participants. I know: my kids used them as toys when they were kids and I used them for training as a police officer.

    According to the article, the photo Zachary “liked” was of a “plastic gun on the table, with the caption, “Ready.” You might wonder if this social media “like” was just one facet of a multifaceted set of nefarious circumstances that created suspicion about the student. Nope. That was it; Zach “liked” a picture of a toy on social media. WBRC reported, “Superintendent Russ Fussnecker essentially admitted that the school’s reaction was based only on the picture.”

    Let’s look at the bright side: Zach is getting a civics lesson, thanks to his overreacting, overreaching school officials: One, his First Amendment rights were violated when the district punished him for expressing his point of view. He let people know he liked a picture (it could be argued that his Fifth Amendment rights were also violated when he was suspended without due process). Two, his Second Amendment rights were, effectively, violated when a toy facsimile of a firearm became the focal point of Zachary’s discipline.

    Now, for constitutional violation number three: The Fourth Amendment prohibition against unlawful searches and seizures. According to the article, “The next morning, Zachary told a WBRC reporter, school officials, ‘called me down… patted me down and checked me for weapons, then they told me I was getting expelled or suspended or whatever.’” Where was the warrant? Where was the probable cause? Where was the reasonable suspicion? (Where is the ACLU?) And, finally, where was the common sense?

  • I Suppose Seattle’s Language Pirates Could Have Used “Comrade.”

    ARE YOU KIDDING ME???

    Never, ever, think that the lunacy oozing from Seattle’s leftist Laboratory can’t reach new heights—or depths. Per MYNorthwest.com, when Seattle police officers complete use-of-force reports, now, they are no longer allowed to use the term “suspect” to describe, well, a suspect.

    What term have they come up with that better describes a suspect who has presented enough resistance or threat, including deadly, that officers had to use force, including deadly, to subdue the suspect? “Community member.” No folks, this is not a SNL skit or a story from The Onion; this is what has become normal for Seattle.

    Can you imagine? I’m a cop. I’ve just come in after having arrested a career criminal who pulled a knife and tried to stab me. I finally get to writing my reports including a use-of-force report. Now, I’ve got a lot of names I’d like to call the criminal, but I settle for “suspect,” because that’s what he is: suspected in a crime—resisting arrest and assaulting an officer (Me!) with a deadly weapon.

    However, I can no longer use the term “suspect.” People in city government, and vendors selling progressive law enforcement software, most who have never been cops and don’t have the slightest idea what cops do, have a better—more respectful—term for suspects who fight with police officers.

    Use-of-Force Statement: This is a true and involuntary statement given by me, Officer… Blah, blah, blah. On yadda, yadda date, at 0-dark-30, I was dispatched to a disturbance at a house known for narcotics sales and frequent violent criminal activities. On arrival I observed the community member, later identified as…, stride in an aggressive manner toward my patrol car. I exited my vehicle and told the community member to stop. The community member failed to obey my instructions. When the community member was within 10 feet of me, the community member reached into his jacket and withdrew a knife with what appeared to be an 8-10 inch fixed blade. I drew my department-issued sidearm and ordered the community member to stop and drop the knife. Instead, the community member….  

    Again, are you kidding me?

    People who know my writing, know that I hesitate to use words and phrases that convey personal attacks rather than those that attack a person’s actions or views. But, come on… Who was the idiot, moron—fool who came up with or is forcing Seattle’s cops to use this politically correct excrement?

    Using the term “community member” to describe a dangerous suspect is yet another attack on police officers whose job it is to deal with Seattle’s human vermin. “Community member” conveys an air of respectability violent criminal suspects don’t deserve.

    Oh, wait a minute. I just thought of something. I suppose Seattle’s social justice language pirates may actually have held back on the term they truly would have preferred. Perhaps, we should be thankful they didn’t order cops to refer to a suspect as, “comrade.”